Java – Convert date and time between timezone

timezone

In this tutorial, we will show you few examples (ZonedDateTime (Java 8), Date, Calendar and Joda Time) to convert a date and time between different time zones.

All examples will be converting the date and time from


(UTC+8:00) Asia/Singapore - Singapore Time
Date : 22-1-2015 10:15:55 AM

to


(UTC-5:00) America/New_York - Eastern Standard Time
Date : 21-1-2015 09:15:55 PM
Which to use?
For time zone, avoid both Date and Calendar

  1. If you are using JDK >= 8, use the new java.time.* framework.
  2. If you are using JDK < 8, use Joda Time. (The new Java 8 java.time.* framework is inspired by this library)

1. ZonedDateTime

Always use this new Java 8 java.time.ZonedDateTime to represent a date and time containing time zone.

ZonedDateTimeExample.java

package com.mkyong.date;

import java.time.LocalDateTime;
import java.time.ZoneId;
import java.time.ZonedDateTime;
import java.time.format.DateTimeFormatter;

public class ZonedDateTimeExample {

    private static final String DATE_FORMAT = "dd-M-yyyy hh:mm:ss a";

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        String dateInString = "22-1-2015 10:15:55 AM";
        LocalDateTime ldt = LocalDateTime.parse(dateInString, DateTimeFormatter.ofPattern(DATE_FORMAT));

        ZoneId singaporeZoneId = ZoneId.of("Asia/Singapore");
        System.out.println("TimeZone : " + singaporeZoneId);

        //LocalDateTime + ZoneId = ZonedDateTime
        ZonedDateTime asiaZonedDateTime = ldt.atZone(singaporeZoneId);
        System.out.println("Date (Singapore) : " + asiaZonedDateTime);

        ZoneId newYokZoneId = ZoneId.of("America/New_York");
        System.out.println("TimeZone : " + newYokZoneId);

        ZonedDateTime nyDateTime = asiaZonedDateTime.withZoneSameInstant(newYokZoneId);
        System.out.println("Date (New York) : " + nyDateTime);

        DateTimeFormatter format = DateTimeFormatter.ofPattern(DATE_FORMAT);
        System.out.println("\n---DateTimeFormatter---");
        System.out.println("Date (Singapore) : " + format.format(asiaZonedDateTime));
        System.out.println("Date (New York) : " + format.format(nyDateTime));

    }

}

Output


TimeZone : Asia/Singapore
Date (Singapore) : 2015-01-22T10:15:55+08:00[Asia/Singapore]
TimeZone : America/New_York
Date (New York) : 2015-01-21T21:15:55-05:00[America/New_York]

---DateTimeFormatter---
Date (Singapore) : 22-1-2015 10:15:55 AM
Date (New York) : 21-1-2015 09:15:55 PM
Note
Refer to this ZonedDateTime tutorial for more time zone, custom offset and daylight saving time (DST) examples.

2. Date

Note
The java.util.Date has no concept of time zone, and only represents the number of seconds passed since the Unix epoch time – 1970-01-01T00:00:00Z. But, if you print the Date object directly, the Date object will be always printed with the default system time zone. Check the Date.toString() source code.

2.1 Set a time zone to DateFormat and format the java.util.Date


SimpleDateFormat sdfAmerica = new SimpleDateFormat("dd-M-yyyy hh:mm:ss a");
sdfAmerica.setTimeZone(TimeZone.getTimeZone("America/New_York"));
String sDateInAmerica = sdfAmerica.format(date);

2.2 Full example

DateExample.java

package com.mkyong.date;

import java.text.ParseException;
import java.text.SimpleDateFormat;
import java.util.Date;
import java.util.TimeZone;

public class DateExample {

    private static final String DATE_FORMAT = "dd-M-yyyy hh:mm:ss a";

    public static void main(String[] args) throws ParseException {

        SimpleDateFormat formatter = new SimpleDateFormat(DATE_FORMAT);

        String dateInString = "22-01-2015 10:15:55 AM";
        Date date = formatter.parse(dateInString);
        TimeZone tz = TimeZone.getDefault();

        // From TimeZone Asia/Singapore
        System.out.println("TimeZone : " + tz.getID() + " - " + tz.getDisplayName());
        System.out.println("TimeZone : " + tz);
        System.out.println("Date (Singapore) : " + formatter.format(date));

        // To TimeZone America/New_York
        SimpleDateFormat sdfAmerica = new SimpleDateFormat(DATE_FORMAT);
        TimeZone tzInAmerica = TimeZone.getTimeZone("America/New_York");
        sdfAmerica.setTimeZone(tzInAmerica);

        String sDateInAmerica = sdfAmerica.format(date); // Convert to String first
        Date dateInAmerica = formatter.parse(sDateInAmerica); // Create a new Date object

        System.out.println("\nTimeZone : " + tzInAmerica.getID() + " - " + tzInAmerica.getDisplayName());
        System.out.println("TimeZone : " + tzInAmerica);
        System.out.println("Date (New York) (String) : " + sDateInAmerica);
        System.out.println("Date (New York) (Object) : " + formatter.format(dateInAmerica));

    }

}

Output


TimeZone : Asia/Kuala_Lumpur - Malaysia Time
TimeZone : sun.util.calendar.ZoneInfo[id="Asia/Kuala_Lumpur",...]
Date (Singapore) : 22-1-2015 10:15:55 AM

TimeZone : America/New_York - Eastern Standard Time
TimeZone : sun.util.calendar.ZoneInfo[id="America/New_York",...]
Date (New York) (String) : 21-1-2015 09:15:55 PM
Date (New York) (Object) : 21-1-2015 09:15:55 PM

3. Calendar

3.1 A Calendar example to set a time zone :


	Calendar calendar = new GregorianCalendar();
	calendar.setTime(date);
	calendar.setTimeZone(tzInAmerica);

A super common mistake is to get the java.util.Date directly like this :


	//Wrong, it will display 22-1-2015 10:15:55 AM, time is still in the system default time zone!
	Date dateInAmerican = calendar.getTime()); 

In the above example, no matter what time zone you set in the Calendar, the Date object will be always printed with the default system time zone. (Check the Date.toString() source code)

3.2 The correct way should be using the DateFormat to format it :


	SimpleDateFormat sdfAmerica = new SimpleDateFormat("dd-M-yyyy hh:mm:ss a");
	TimeZone tzInAmerica = TimeZone.getTimeZone("America/New_York");
	sdfAmerica.setTimeZone(tzInAmerica);
	sdfAmerica.format(calendar.getTime())

or get the Date via calendar.get() :


	int year = calendar.get(Calendar.YEAR);
	int month = calendar.get(Calendar.MONTH); // Jan = 0, dec = 11
	int dayOfMonth = calendar.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_MONTH);
	int hour = calendar.get(Calendar.HOUR); // 12 hour clock
	int hourOfDay = calendar.get(Calendar.HOUR_OF_DAY); // 24 hour clock
	int minute = calendar.get(Calendar.MINUTE);
	int second = calendar.get(Calendar.SECOND);
	int ampm = calendar.get(Calendar.AM_PM); //0 = AM , 1 = PM

3.3 Full example

CalendarExample.java

package com.mkyong.date;

import java.text.ParseException;
import java.text.SimpleDateFormat;
import java.util.Calendar;
import java.util.Date;
import java.util.GregorianCalendar;
import java.util.TimeZone;

public class CalendarExample {

    private static final String DATE_FORMAT = "dd-M-yyyy hh:mm:ss a";

    public static void main(String[] args) throws ParseException {

        SimpleDateFormat formatter = new SimpleDateFormat(DATE_FORMAT);

        String dateInString = "22-01-2015 10:15:55 AM";
        Date date = formatter.parse(dateInString);
        TimeZone tz = TimeZone.getDefault();

        // From TimeZone Asia/Singapore
        System.out.println("TimeZone : " + tz.getID() + " - " + tz.getDisplayName());
        System.out.println("TimeZone : " + tz);
        System.out.println("Date (Singapore) : " + formatter.format(date));

        // To TimeZone America/New_York
        SimpleDateFormat sdfAmerica = new SimpleDateFormat(DATE_FORMAT);
        TimeZone tzInAmerica = TimeZone.getTimeZone("America/New_York");
        sdfAmerica.setTimeZone(tzInAmerica);

        Calendar calendar = new GregorianCalendar();
        calendar.setTime(date);
        calendar.setTimeZone(tzInAmerica);

        System.out.println("\nTimeZone : " + tzInAmerica.getID() + " - " + tzInAmerica.getDisplayName());
        System.out.println("TimeZone : " + tzInAmerica);

        //Wrong! It will print the date with the system default time zone
        System.out.println("Date (New York) (Wrong!): " + calendar.getTime());

        //Correct! need formatter
        System.out.println("Date (New York) (Correct!) : " + sdfAmerica.format(calendar.getTime()));

        int year = calendar.get(Calendar.YEAR);
        int month = calendar.get(Calendar.MONTH); // Jan = 0, dec = 11
        int dayOfMonth = calendar.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_MONTH);
        int hour = calendar.get(Calendar.HOUR); // 12 hour clock
        int hourOfDay = calendar.get(Calendar.HOUR_OF_DAY); // 24 hour clock
        int minute = calendar.get(Calendar.MINUTE);
        int second = calendar.get(Calendar.SECOND);
        int ampm = calendar.get(Calendar.AM_PM); //0 = AM , 1 = PM

        //Correct
        System.out.println("\nyear \t\t: " + year);
        System.out.println("month \t\t: " + month + 1);
        System.out.println("dayOfMonth \t: " + dayOfMonth);
        System.out.println("hour \t\t: " + hour);
        System.out.println("minute \t\t: " + minute);
        System.out.println("second \t\t: " + second);
        System.out.println("ampm \t\t: " + ampm);

    }

}

Output


TimeZone : Asia/Kuala_Lumpur - Malaysia Time
TimeZone : sun.util.calendar.ZoneInfo[id="Asia/Kuala_Lumpur",...]
Date (Singapore) : 22-1-2015 10:15:55 AM

TimeZone : America/New_York - Eastern Standard Time
TimeZone : sun.util.calendar.ZoneInfo[id="America/New_York",...]]
Date (New York) (Wrong!): Thu Jan 22 10:15:55 MYT 2015
Date (New York) (Correct!) : 21-1-2015 09:15:55 PM

year 		: 2015
month 		: 01
dayOfMonth 	: 21
hour 		: 9
minute 		: 15
second 		: 55
ampm 		: 1

4. Joda Time

4.1 A Joda Time example to set a time zone :


	DateTime dt = new DateTime(date);
	DateTimeZone dtZone = DateTimeZone.forID("America/New_York");
	DateTime dtus = dt.withZone(dtZone);

Again, a common mistake is getting the Date directly like this, time zone will be lost.


	//Output : 22-1-2015 10:15:55 AM
	Date dateInAmerica = dtus.toDate();

The correct way is converted to Joda LocalDateTime first.


	//Output : 21-1-2015 09:15:55 PM
	Date dateInAmerica = dtus.toLocalDateTime().toDate();

4.2 Full example

JodaTimeExample.java

package com.mkyong.date;

import org.joda.time.DateTime;
import org.joda.time.DateTimeZone;

import java.text.ParseException;
import java.text.SimpleDateFormat;
import java.util.Date;
import java.util.TimeZone;

public class JodaTimeExample {

    private static final String DATE_FORMAT = "dd-M-yyyy hh:mm:ss a";

    public static void main(String[] args) throws ParseException {

        SimpleDateFormat formatter = new SimpleDateFormat(DATE_FORMAT);

        String dateInString = "22-01-2015 10:15:55 AM";
        Date date = formatter.parse(dateInString);
        TimeZone tz = TimeZone.getDefault();

        // From TimeZone Asia/Singapore
        System.out.println("TimeZone : " + tz.getID() + " - " + tz.getDisplayName());
        System.out.println("TimeZone : " + tz);
        System.out.println("Date (Singapore) : " + formatter.format(date));

        // To TimeZone America/New_York
        SimpleDateFormat sdfAmerica = new SimpleDateFormat(DATE_FORMAT);
        DateTime dt = new DateTime(date);
        DateTimeZone dtZone = DateTimeZone.forID("America/New_York");
        DateTime dtus = dt.withZone(dtZone);
        TimeZone tzInAmerica = dtZone.toTimeZone();
        Date dateInAmerica = dtus.toLocalDateTime().toDate(); //Convert to LocalDateTime first

        sdfAmerica.setTimeZone(tzInAmerica);

        System.out.println("\nTimeZone : " + tzInAmerica.getID() + " - " + tzInAmerica.getDisplayName());
        System.out.println("TimeZone : " + tzInAmerica);
        System.out.println("DateTimeZone : " + dtZone);
        System.out.println("DateTime : " + dtus);

        System.out.println("dateInAmerica (Formatter) : " + formatter.format(dateInAmerica));
        System.out.println("dateInAmerica (Object) : " + dateInAmerica);

    }

}

Output


TimeZone : Asia/Kuala_Lumpur - Malaysia Time
TimeZone : sun.util.calendar.ZoneInfo[id="Asia/Kuala_Lumpur",...]
Date (Singapore) : 22-1-2015 10:15:55 AM

TimeZone : America/New_York - Eastern Standard Time
TimeZone : sun.util.calendar.ZoneInfo[id="America/New_York",...]
DateTimeZone : America/New_York
DateTime : 2015-01-21T21:15:55.000-05:00
dateInAmerica (Formatter) : 21-1-2015 09:15:55 PM
dateInAmerica (Object) : Wed Jan 21 21:15:55 MYT 2015

P.S Tested with Joda-time 2.9.4

References

  1. Date and Time Manipulation in Java Using JodaTime
  2. World Time Server
  3. Java 8 – ZonedDateTime examples
  4. Java 8 – Convert Date to LocalDate and LocalDateTime
  5. ZonedDateTime Javadoc
  6. Calendar JavaDoc
  7. Date JavaDoc
  8. SimpledateFormat JavaDoc

About the Author

author image
mkyong
Founder of Mkyong.com, love Java and open source stuff. Follow him on Twitter. If you like my tutorials, consider make a donation to these charities.

Comments

avatar
12 Comment threads
7 Thread replies
1 Followers
 
Most reacted comment
Hottest comment thread
14 Comment authors
Ahmad FirdausShashikanth ChannagiriAndreaNirmalya SenguptaRafael Recent comment authors
newest oldest most voted
Andrea
Guest
Andrea

Given that your tutorials are always the best, please could you explain better the following sentence: “In the above example, no matter what time zone you set in the Calendar”.
What is the purpose of the Calendar.setTimeZone() method if it has no use ?
Regards

Ahmad Firdaus
Guest
Ahmad Firdaus

Hello. What programming code that I can use for social media application? I want to get exact date and time from another country or region. As example situation; My friend from London create a post on Saturday, 18:00Hrs. When I (from Malaysia) see his post, the date time will be in my own country or region date and time. Sorry for inconvenient.

Nirmalya Sengupta
Guest
Nirmalya Sengupta

This is extremely succinct and useful. For a day-to-day work with Dates and Times, I find Javadoc to be very extensive (and, worth pouring over) but not immediately useful for a quick and dirty PoC. Many Thanks, Mykong.

Rafael
Guest
Rafael

Well done, Mkyong! It works like a charm, here!

Nick
Guest
Nick

There is a bug in your code in section 3.3. The line System.out.println(“month tt: ” + month + 1) should have parentheses around “month+1”. The current code simply appends the number “1” to the end of the string representation of “month”. For example, if month=5, then that line will print “51”.

Sumit Paliwal
Guest
Sumit Paliwal

The article is really useful, however I found a strange error with the ZonedDateTime. (Obviously not with your provided code, but with the library itself). In case if I try to convert time from Timezone “Europe/Istanbul” to “UTC” there was a difference of 1 hour in output time on comparison with real time… Also it seemed to be considering DST as well, which happened to occur in March.. But In Istanbul, DST won’t be happening from 2017-2020… so may be that might not have got updated in this library… Just a guess.. Would like to know the exact reason.. My… Read more »

Paulo Lucio Oliveira Junior
Guest
Paulo Lucio Oliveira Junior

I was making mistake exactly in this “//Wrong!” part while using Calendar.
Everything is clear now. Thank you.

mkyong
Guest
mkyong

haha, same here!

If possible try the new java.time.*, it is much better than the old Date and Calendar.

Vinay Kanth
Guest
Vinay Kanth

in first example when i use same time zone then also showing different time .

TimeZone : America/New_York – Eastern Standard Time
TimeZone : sun.util.calendar.ZoneInfo[id=”America/New_York”,offset=-18000000,dstSavings=3600000,useDaylight=true,transitions=235,lastRule=java.util.SimpleTimeZone[id=America/New_York,offset=-18000000,dstSavings=3600000,useDaylight=true,startYear=0,startMode=3,startMonth=2,startDay=8,startDayOfWeek=1,startTime=7200000,startTimeMode=0,endMode=3,endMonth=10,endDay=1,endDayOfWeek=1,endTime=7200000,endTimeMode=0]]
Date : 22-1-2015 10:15:55 AM

TimeZone : America/New_York – Eastern Standard Time
TimeZone : sun.util.calendar.ZoneInfo[id=”America/New_York”,offset=-18000000,dstSavings=3600000,useDaylight=true,transitions=235,lastRule=java.util.SimpleTimeZone[id=America/New_York,offset=-18000000,dstSavings=3600000,useDaylight=true,startYear=0,startMode=3,startMonth=2,startDay=8,startDayOfWeek=1,startTime=7200000,startTimeMode=0,endMode=3,endMonth=10,endDay=1,endDayOfWeek=1,endTime=7200000,endTimeMode=0]]
Date (String) : 22-1-2015 01:15:55 PM
Date (Object) : 22-1-2015 01:15:55 PM

mkyong
Guest
mkyong

Try set the time zone to the date formatter.

Arun Bhaskaran
Guest
Arun Bhaskaran

I’m using joda 1.6.2, but LocalDateTime does not seem to have method toDate()
Date dateInAmerica = dtus.toLocalDateTime().toDate(); //Convert to LocalDateTime

Arun Bhaskaran
Guest
Arun Bhaskaran

updated to 2.9.1 and is working as expected.. Thanks!

mkyong
Guest
mkyong

My code is tested with 2.9.4, it should works in 2.x

CodeCrock
Guest
CodeCrock

Thanks! can you convert this to Java 8 using the new java.time packages?

mkyong
Guest
mkyong

Article is updated with the new java.time – ZonedDateTime example. And this should be the preferable solution.

kora
Guest
kora

how can i make a time converter in javafx with interfaces

Atul Shirke
Guest
Atul Shirke

I have an issue here. I have gone through all the related post but wasnt able to get rid of this situation. I am trying to convert a US/Pacific date from string to a date object: SimpleDateFormat df = new SimpleDateFormat(“dd-MM-yy HH:mm:SS a z”); df.setTimeZone(TimeZoneUtil.getTimeZone(“US/Pacific”)); String userTime = df.format(date);// User Time – Returns correct US/Pacific time Date userDate = df.parse(userTime); // Always returns the date in EDT I understand that Date does not have its own format but I am completely foxed to see parse method returning the EDT time. My question is that I want to convert userTime string… Read more »

mkyong
Guest
mkyong

Refer to the Example 2 – Date. If possible, use the new Java 8 ZonedDateTime

Shashikanth Channagiri
Guest
Shashikanth Channagiri

Great Article