In last tutorial, you use Maven to create a simple Java project structure, and demonstrate how to use Hibernate in Spring framework to do the data manipulation works(insert, select, update and delete) in MySQL database. In this tutorial, you will learn how to do the same thing in Spring and Hibernate annotation way.

Prerequisite requirement

– Installed and configured Maven, MySQL, Eclipse IDE.

The javaee.jar library is required as well, you can get it from j2ee SDK, and include it manually, there is no full version of javaee.jar available in any of the Maven repository yet.

Final project structure

Your final project file structure should look exactly like following, if you get lost in the folder structure creation, please review this folder structure here.

1. Table creation

Create a ‘stock’ table in MySQL database. SQL statement as follow :

CREATE TABLE  `mkyong`.`stock` (
  `STOCK_ID` INT(10) UNSIGNED NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `STOCK_CODE` VARCHAR(10) NOT NULL,
  `STOCK_NAME` VARCHAR(20) NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`STOCK_ID`) USING BTREE,
  UNIQUE KEY `UNI_STOCK_NAME` (`STOCK_NAME`),
  UNIQUE KEY `UNI_STOCK_ID` (`STOCK_CODE`) USING BTREE
) ENGINE=InnoDB AUTO_INCREMENT=11 DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8;

2. Project File Structure

Create a quick project file structure with Maven command ‘mvn archetype:generate‘, see example here. Convert it to Eclipse project (mvn eclipse:eclipse) and import it into Eclipse IDE.

E:\workspace>mvn archetype:generate
[INFO] Scanning for projects...
...
Choose a number:  
(1/2/3....) 15: : 15
...
Define value for groupId: : com.mkyong.common
Define value for artifactId: : HibernateExample
Define value for version:  1.0-SNAPSHOT: :
Define value for package:  com.mkyong.common: : com.mkyong.common
[INFO] OldArchetype created in dir: E:\workspace\HibernateExample
[INFO] ------------------------------------------------------------------------
[INFO] BUILD SUCCESSFUL
[INFO] ------------------------------------------------------------------------

3. Pom.xml file configuration

Add the Spring, Hibernate, Annotation and MySQL and their dependency in the Maven’s pom.xml file.

<project xmlns="http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0" 
  xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
  xsi:schemaLocation="http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0 
  http://maven.apache.org/maven-v4_0_0.xsd">
  <modelVersion>4.0.0</modelVersion>
  <groupId>com.mkyong.common</groupId>
  <artifactId>SpringExample</artifactId>
  <packaging>jar</packaging>
  <version>1.0-SNAPSHOT</version>
  <name>SpringExample</name>
  <url>http://maven.apache.org</url>
 
  <repositories>
    <repository>
      <id>JBoss repository</id>
      <url>http://repository.jboss.com/maven2/</url>
    </repository>
  </repositories>
 
  <dependencies>
 
        <!-- JUnit testing framework -->
        <dependency>
                <groupId>junit</groupId>
                <artifactId>junit</artifactId>
                <version>3.8.1</version>
                <scope>test</scope>
        </dependency>
 
        <!-- Spring framework -->
	<dependency>
		<groupId>org.springframework</groupId>
		<artifactId>spring</artifactId>
		<version>2.5.6</version>
	</dependency>
 
        <!-- Spring AOP dependency -->
        <dependency>
    	        <groupId>cglib</groupId>
		<artifactId>cglib</artifactId>
		<version>2.2</version>
	</dependency>
 
        <!-- MySQL database driver -->
	<dependency>
		<groupId>mysql</groupId>
		<artifactId>mysql-connector-java</artifactId>
		<version>5.1.9</version>
	</dependency>
 
	<!-- Hibernate framework -->
	<dependency>
		<groupId>hibernate</groupId>
		<artifactId>hibernate3</artifactId>
		<version>3.2.3.GA</version>
	</dependency>
 
	<!-- Hibernate annotation -->
	<dependency>
		<groupId>hibernate-annotations</groupId>
		<artifactId>hibernate-annotations</artifactId>
		<version>3.3.0.GA</version>
	</dependency>
 
	<dependency>
		<groupId>hibernate-commons-annotations</groupId>
		<artifactId>hibernate-commons-annotations</artifactId>
		<version>3.0.0.GA</version>
	</dependency>
 
	<!-- Hibernate library dependecy start -->
	<dependency>
		<groupId>dom4j</groupId>
		<artifactId>dom4j</artifactId>
		<version>1.6.1</version>
	</dependency>
 
	<dependency>
		<groupId>commons-logging</groupId>
		<artifactId>commons-logging</artifactId>
		<version>1.1.1</version>
	</dependency>
 
	<dependency>
		<groupId>commons-collections</groupId>
		<artifactId>commons-collections</artifactId>
		<version>3.2.1</version>
	</dependency>
 
	<dependency>
		<groupId>antlr</groupId>
		<artifactId>antlr</artifactId>
		<version>2.7.7</version>
	</dependency>
	<!-- Hibernate library dependecy end -->
 
  </dependencies>
</project>

4. Model & BO & DAO

The Model, Business Object (BO) and Data Access Object (DAO) pattern is useful to identify the layer clearly to avoid mess up the project structure.

Stock Model (Annotation)

A Stock model annotation class to store the stock data.

package com.mkyong.stock.model;
 
import javax.persistence.Column;
import javax.persistence.Entity;
import javax.persistence.GeneratedValue;
import static javax.persistence.GenerationType.IDENTITY;
import javax.persistence.Id;
import javax.persistence.Table;
import javax.persistence.UniqueConstraint;
 
@Entity
@Table(name = "stock", catalog = "mkyong", uniqueConstraints = {
		@UniqueConstraint(columnNames = "STOCK_NAME"),
		@UniqueConstraint(columnNames = "STOCK_CODE") })
public class Stock implements java.io.Serializable {
 
	private Integer stockId;
	private String stockCode;
	private String stockName;
 
	public Stock() {
	}
 
	public Stock(String stockCode, String stockName) {
		this.stockCode = stockCode;
		this.stockName = stockName;
	}
 
	@Id
	@GeneratedValue(strategy = IDENTITY)
	@Column(name = "STOCK_ID", unique = true, nullable = false)
	public Integer getStockId() {
		return this.stockId;
	}
 
	public void setStockId(Integer stockId) {
		this.stockId = stockId;
	}
 
	@Column(name = "STOCK_CODE", unique = true, nullable = false, length = 10)
	public String getStockCode() {
		return this.stockCode;
	}
 
	public void setStockCode(String stockCode) {
		this.stockCode = stockCode;
	}
 
	@Column(name = "STOCK_NAME", unique = true, nullable = false, length = 20)
	public String getStockName() {
		return this.stockName;
	}
 
	public void setStockName(String stockName) {
		this.stockName = stockName;
	}
 
	@Override
	public String toString() {
		return "Stock [stockCode=" + stockCode + ", stockId=" + stockId
				+ ", stockName=" + stockName + "]";
	}
}
Stock Business Object (BO))

Stock business object (BO) interface and implementation, it’s used to store the project’s business function, the real database operations (CRUD) works should not involved in this class, instead it has a DAO (StockDao) class to do it.

package com.mkyong.stock.bo;
 
import com.mkyong.stock.model.Stock;
 
public interface StockBo {
 
	void save(Stock stock);
	void update(Stock stock);
	void delete(Stock stock);
	Stock findByStockCode(String stockCode);
}

Make this class as a bean “stockBo” in Spring Ioc container, and autowire the stock dao class.

package com.mkyong.stock.bo.impl;
 
import org.springframework.beans.factory.annotation.Autowired;
import org.springframework.stereotype.Service;
 
import com.mkyong.stock.bo.StockBo;
import com.mkyong.stock.dao.StockDao;
import com.mkyong.stock.model.Stock;
 
@Service("stockBo")
public class StockBoImpl implements StockBo{
 
	@Autowired
	StockDao stockDao;
 
	public void setStockDao(StockDao stockDao) {
		this.stockDao = stockDao;
	}
 
	public void save(Stock stock){
		stockDao.save(stock);
	}
 
	public void update(Stock stock){
		stockDao.update(stock);
	}
 
	public void delete(Stock stock){
		stockDao.delete(stock);
	}
 
	public Stock findByStockCode(String stockCode){
		return stockDao.findByStockCode(stockCode);
	}
}
Stock Data Access Object

A Stock DAO interface and implementation. In last tutorial, you DAO classes are directly extends the “HibernateDaoSupport“, but it’s not possible to do it in annotation mode, because you have no way to auto wire the session Factory bean from your DAO class. The workaround is create a custom class (CustomHibernateDaoSupport) and extends the “HibernateDaoSupport” and auto wire the session factory, and your DAO classes extends this class.

package com.mkyong.stock.dao;
 
import com.mkyong.stock.model.Stock;
 
public interface StockDao {
 
	void save(Stock stock);
	void update(Stock stock);
	void delete(Stock stock);
	Stock findByStockCode(String stockCode);
 
}
package com.mkyong.util;
 
import org.hibernate.SessionFactory;
import org.springframework.beans.factory.annotation.Autowired;
import org.springframework.orm.hibernate3.support.HibernateDaoSupport;
 
public abstract class CustomHibernateDaoSupport extends HibernateDaoSupport
{    
    @Autowired
    public void anyMethodName(SessionFactory sessionFactory)
    {
        setSessionFactory(sessionFactory);
    }
}
package com.mkyong.stock.dao.impl;
 
import java.util.List;
 
import org.springframework.stereotype.Repository;
 
import com.mkyong.stock.dao.StockDao;
import com.mkyong.stock.model.Stock;
import com.mkyong.util.CustomHibernateDaoSupport;
 
@Repository("stockDao")
public class StockDaoImpl extends CustomHibernateDaoSupport implements StockDao{
 
	public void save(Stock stock){
		getHibernateTemplate().save(stock);
	}
 
	public void update(Stock stock){
		getHibernateTemplate().update(stock);
	}
 
	public void delete(Stock stock){
		getHibernateTemplate().delete(stock);
	}
 
	public Stock findByStockCode(String stockCode){
		List list = getHibernateTemplate().find(
                     "from Stock where stockCode=?",stockCode
                );
		return (Stock)list.get(0);
	}
 
}

5. Resource Configuration

Create a ‘resources‘ folder under ‘project_name/main/java/‘, Maven will treat all files under this folder as resources file. It will used to store the Spring, Hibernate and others configuration file.

Spring Configuration

Database related….

Create a properties file (database.properties) for the database details, put it into the “resources/properties” folder. It’s good practice disparate the database details and Spring bean configuration into different files.

database.properties

jdbc.driverClassName=com.mysql.jdbc.Driver
jdbc.url=jdbc:mysql://localhost:3306/mkyong
jdbc.username=root
jdbc.password=password

Create a “dataSource” bean configuration file (DataSource.xml) for your database, and import the properties from database.properties, put it into the “resources/database” folder.

DataSource.xml

<beans xmlns="http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans"
xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
xsi:schemaLocation="http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans
http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans/spring-beans-2.5.xsd">
 
<bean 
class="org.springframework.beans.factory.config.PropertyPlaceholderConfigurer">
	<property name="location">
		<value>properties/database.properties</value>
	</property>
</bean>
 
<bean id="dataSource" 
         class="org.springframework.jdbc.datasource.DriverManagerDataSource">
	<property name="driverClassName" value="${jdbc.driverClassName}" />
	<property name="url" value="${jdbc.url}" />
	<property name="username" value="${jdbc.username}" />
	<property name="password" value="${jdbc.password}" />
</bean>
 
</beans>

Hibernate related….

Create a session factory bean configuration file (Hibernate.xml), put it into the “resources/database” folder. In annotation you have to use the AnnotationSessionFactoryBean, instead of LocalSessionFactoryBean, and specify your annotated model classes in ‘annotatedClasses‘ property instead of ‘mappingResources‘ property.

Hibernate.xml

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<beans xmlns="http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans"
xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
xsi:schemaLocation="http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans
http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans/spring-beans-2.5.xsd">
 
<!-- Hibernate session factory -->
<bean id="sessionFactory" 
class="org.springframework.orm.hibernate3.annotation.AnnotationSessionFactoryBean">
 
    <property name="dataSource">
      <ref bean="dataSource"/>
    </property>
 
    <property name="hibernateProperties">
       <props>
         <prop key="hibernate.dialect">org.hibernate.dialect.MySQLDialect</prop>
         <prop key="hibernate.show_sql">true</prop>
       </props>
    </property>
 
    <property name="annotatedClasses">
	<list>
		<value>com.mkyong.stock.model.Stock</value>
	</list>
    </property>
 
    </bean>
</beans>

Import all the Spring’s beans configuration files into a single file (BeanLocations.xml), put it into the “resources/config” folder.

BeanLocations.xml
Import the Spring database configuration and enable the Spring’s auto scan feature.

<beans xmlns="http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans"
xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
xmlns:context="http://www.springframework.org/schema/context"
xsi:schemaLocation="http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans
http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans/spring-beans-2.5.xsd
http://www.springframework.org/schema/context
http://www.springframework.org/schema/context/spring-context-2.5.xsd">
 
	<!-- Database Configuration -->
	<import resource="../database/DataSource.xml"/>
	<import resource="../database/Hibernate.xml"/>
 
	<!-- Auto scan the components -->
	<context:component-scan 
		base-package="com.mkyong.stock" />
 
</beans>

6. Run it

You have all the files and configurations , run it.

package com.mkyong.common;
 
import org.springframework.context.ApplicationContext;
import org.springframework.context.support.ClassPathXmlApplicationContext;
 
import com.mkyong.stock.bo.StockBo;
import com.mkyong.stock.model.Stock;
 
public class App 
{
    public static void main( String[] args )
    {
    	ApplicationContext appContext = 
    	  new ClassPathXmlApplicationContext("spring/config/BeanLocations.xml");
 
    	StockBo stockBo = (StockBo)appContext.getBean("stockBo");
 
    	/** insert **/
    	Stock stock = new Stock();
    	stock.setStockCode("7668");
    	stock.setStockName("HAIO");
    	stockBo.save(stock);
 
    	/** select **/
    	Stock stock2 = stockBo.findByStockCode("7668");
    	System.out.println(stock2);
 
    	/** update **/
    	stock2.setStockName("HAIO-1");
    	stockBo.update(stock2);
 
    	/** delete **/
    	stockBo.delete(stock2);
 
    	System.out.println("Done");
    }
}

output

Hibernate: insert into mkyong.stock (STOCK_CODE, STOCK_NAME) values (?, ?)
Hibernate: select stock0_.STOCK_ID as STOCK1_0_, 
stock0_.STOCK_CODE as STOCK2_0_, stock0_.STOCK_NAME as STOCK3_0_ 
from mkyong.stock stock0_ where stock0_.STOCK_CODE=?
Stock [stockCode=7668, stockId=11, stockName=HAIO]
Hibernate: update mkyong.stock set STOCK_CODE=?, STOCK_NAME=? where STOCK_ID=?
Hibernate: delete from mkyong.stock where STOCK_ID=?
Done

Conclusion

All Spring, Hibernate related classes and configuration files are annotated, it just left the database details in XML file. Should you know how to annotate the database configuration details, please let me know. Personally, i do not use annotation feature much, because somehow you may need some workaround for certain situation, like ‘CustomHibernateDaoSupport’ extends ‘HibernateDaoSupport’ above. The mature developed XML file in Spring and Hibernate. is more preferably.

Tags :
Founder of Mkyong.com and HostingCompass.com, love Java and open source stuff. Follow him on Twitter, or befriend him on Facebook or Google Plus. If you like my tutorials, consider making a donation to this charity, thanks.

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