Monetary values are usually programmed in the financial or e-commerce application. When you deal with “money” value, it’s always come to a question – Should I use double or float data type to represent the monetary values?

Answer : Always uses java.math.BigDecimal to represent the monetary values.

1. Monetary values – Double

Here is an example to use double to represent the monetary values in Java.

MoneyDouble.java

package com.mkyong.test;

public class MoneyDouble {

    public static void main(String[] argv) {

        System.out.println("--- Normal Print-----");
        System.out.println(2.00 - 1.1);
        System.out.println(2.00 - 1.2);
        System.out.println(2.00 - 1.3);
        System.out.println(2.00 - 1.4);
        System.out.println(2.00 - 1.5);
        System.out.println(2.00 - 1.6);
        System.out.println(2.00 - 1.7);
        System.out.println(2.00 - 1.8);
        System.out.println(2.00 - 1.9);
        System.out.println(2.00 - 2);
    }

}

Output – It cannot calculate all double decimals precisely.


--- Normal Print-----
0.8999999999999999
0.8
0.7
0.6000000000000001
0.5
0.3999999999999999
0.30000000000000004
0.19999999999999996
0.10000000000000009
0.0

2. Monetary values – BigDecimal

To avoid the decimal issue above, you can use BigDecimal to represent the monetary values.

MoneyBigDecimal.java

package com.mkyong.test;

import java.math.BigDecimal;

public class MoneyBigDecimal {

    public static void main(String[] argv) {

        System.out.println("--- BigDecimal-----");
        System.out.println(new BigDecimal("2.00").subtract(new BigDecimal("1.1")));
        System.out.println(new BigDecimal("2.00").subtract(new BigDecimal("1.2")));
        System.out.println(new BigDecimal("2.00").subtract(new BigDecimal("1.3")));
        System.out.println(new BigDecimal("2.00").subtract(new BigDecimal("1.4")));
        System.out.println(new BigDecimal("2.00").subtract(new BigDecimal("1.5")));
        System.out.println(new BigDecimal("2.00").subtract(new BigDecimal("1.6")));
        System.out.println(new BigDecimal("2.00").subtract(new BigDecimal("1.7")));
        System.out.println(new BigDecimal("2.00").subtract(new BigDecimal("1.8")));
        System.out.println(new BigDecimal("2.00").subtract(new BigDecimal("1.9")));
        System.out.println(new BigDecimal("2.00").subtract(new BigDecimal("2")));
    }

}

Output – BigDecimal performs exact decimal arithmetic.


--- BigDecimal-----
0.90
0.80
0.70
0.60
0.50
0.40
0.30
0.20
0.10
0.00
Note
BigDecimal calculations are slower than those with primitive type calculations, which may be an issue for the mission critical calculation application. For most e-commerce applications, it should be fine.

References

  1. BigDecimal JavaDoc
  2. How to Use Java BigDecimal